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Isabel Feichtner's presentation takes deep seabed mining as a case study to examine the role of law in co-constituting value. She recalls how international law has contributed to a perception of the oceans as a source of raw materials and revenue -- reflected in the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea -- to then focus on current negotiations of a Mining Code at the International Seabed Authority.

Detail Summary
Date 30 September 2019
Time 15:30 - 17:00
Location Roeterseilandcampus - gebouw A
Room A3.01

Abstract

Isabel Feichtner's presentation takes deep seabed mining as a case study to examine the role of law in co-constituting value. She recalls how international law has contributed to a perception of the oceans as a source of raw materials and revenue -- reflected in the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea -- to then focus on current negotiations of a Mining Code at the International Seabed Authority. In these negotiations endeavors to turn the seafloor into commercially valuable mining sites are met with strong opposition fed by environmental and distributive concerns. These debates reveal not only the dominance of money as a measure of value (be it economic or environmental). They also show how using money as a measure of value infuses discussions on resource scarcity and environmental protection with the profit logic inherent in modern money. Looking beyond seabed mining the presentation tentatively explores how the concept of value and the legal study of value may help us better understand possibilities for transforming our extractive political economy.

See also:

Isabel Feichtner, Sharing the Riches of the Sea: The Redistributive and Fiscal Dimension of Deep Seabed Exploitation, European Journal of International Law, Volume 30, Issue 2, May 2019, Pages 601–633, https://doi.org/10.1093/ejil/chz022

 

The Speaker

Isabel Feichtner is Professor of Law at the University of Würzburg. Her research focuses on international economic law, transnational resource law and the legal design of money.

She studied law in Freiburg i. Br., Amsterdam, Berlin and New York, obtained an LL.M. from Cardozo Law School as a Fulbright scholar and was admitted to the New York Bar in 2001. In 2000 she joined the New York office of Cravath, Swaine & Moore as a corporate associate in the securitization department for one year. After completing her legal training in Berlin in 2004 Isabel Feichtner took up a position as senior research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg. From 2006 to the end of 2007 she was Visiting Doctoral Researcher at NYU Law School and teaching assistant to Joseph Weiler. 2010 she completed her doctoral dissertation “The Law and Politics of WTO Waivers – Stability and Flexibility in Public International Law” which was published by Cambridge University Press in 2011.

Before her appointment as professor at the University of Würzburg she was an Associate Professor at Goethe University where she taught and supervised graduate students in the graduate programme Law and Economics of Money and Finance. She is a member of the European Journal of International Law’s editorial board, of the International Law Association Committee on the Role of International Law in Sustainable Natural Resource Management for Development and an associated member of the cluster of excellence Normative Orders at Goethe University Frankfurt.

Roeterseilandcampus - gebouw A
Roeterseilandcampus - gebouw A

Room A3.01

Nieuwe Achtergracht 166
1018 WV Amsterdam